CFAM Announces Winter 2019 Season

The winter exhibition at the Cornell Fine Arts Museum opens on January 17 with three new installations and a publication.

José A. Figueroa (Cuban, b. 1946), De la serie Exilio. Despedidas en calle 17. La Habana (Part 1), 1965 - 1967, Silver gelatin print, The Alfond Collection of Contemporary Art, Cornell Fine Arts Museum, Rollins College 2014.1.51.1 © José A. Figuero. Image courtesy of the artist José A. Figueroa (Cuban, b. 1946), De la serie Exilio. Despedidas en calle 17. La Habana (Part 1), 1965 - 1967, Silver gelatin print, The Alfond Collection of Contemporary Art, Cornell Fine Arts Museum, Rollins College 2014.1.51.1 © José A. Figuero. Image courtesy of the artist

It has been said that exhibitions are what museums do, while collections are what museums are. The Winter 2019 season at the Cornell Fine Arts Museum (CFAM), opening to the public on January 17, 2019, acknowledges this dictum by celebrating the Museum’s permanent collection through three new installations and a publication.

Featuring a selection of collection favorites, works that have not been on view in a long time, and debuting new acquisitions, The Place as Metaphor (on view through May 12) builds conversations around ways of seeing. The works included in this exhibition illustrate the notion of “place” in its varied definitions; examples as early as the 14th century and as recent as 2018 show a wide range of artistic approaches. Organized in thematic subsections, the exhibition examines multiple viewpoints when considering places of devotion, the city, landscape, the artist’s experience, the politics of place, and beyond the immediate.

Markus Brunetti (German, b. 1965), Trani, Cattedrale di San Nicola Pellegrino, 2014-18, Archival pigment print, The Alfond Collection of Contemporary Art, Cornell Fine Arts Museum, Rollins College 2018.1.6. Image courtesy of the artist
Markus Brunetti (German, b. 1965), Trani, Cattedrale di San Nicola Pellegrino, 2014-18, Archival pigment print, The Alfond Collection of Contemporary Art, Cornell Fine Arts Museum, Rollins College 2018.1.6. Image courtesy of the artist

Literal places may refer to cities and buildings—as in works by Jonas Lie and Markus Brunetti—be they real, constructed, or reconstructed. Symbolic places include historical moments, such as in the Alyah portfolio by Salvador Dalí, commissioned to commemorate the formation of the State of Israel, as well as historical objects with multivalent interpretations, such as the segmented replica of the Statue of Liberty, We The People, by Danh Vo and religious objects that inhabited places of faith, such as Seven Saints. Other works reflect on the space included in or inhabited by sculptural objects, such as the Serpentarium by Lynn Aldrich and A Second of Love by Ernesto Neto.


Celebrating the transformation of our permanent collection in the last six years—during which more than 700 new works of art were acquired—The Place as Metaphor is a reminder of the broad scope of the collection and the many transhistorical conversations it engenders. It is also the result of a collaboration between CFAM and Rollins’ students in the Museum Studies Practicum course who worked closely with museum staff. “The exhibition illustrates brilliantly CFAM’s teaching mandate: to explore our contemporary world and our past through the lens of art and to actively involve our students in the interpretation,” says museum director Ena Heller. A select group of works from private collections supplement the installation, as well several important loans from the Art Bridges Program, whose mission is to share outstanding works of American art with those who have limited access to our country’s most meaningful works.

The opening of The Place as Metaphor coincides with the publication of Art Encounters: Selections from the Cornell Fine Arts Museum Collection, produced by CFAM and Scala Publishers; it is the first comprehensive collection catalog for the museum in 25 years.

Francisco de Goya, (Spanish, 1746-1828), Estan Calientes, ca. 1797-1798, Etching, Purchase with funds from the Wally Findlay Acquisition Fund 1990.3
Francisco de Goya, (Spanish, 1746-1828), Estan Calientes, ca. 1797-1798, Etching, Purchase with funds from the Wally Findlay Acquisition Fund 1990.3

Drawn from the permanent collection, Body Snatchers: Death in Culture, curated by Emily Russell, associate professor of English and associate dean of curriculum, and her students is on view through April 7. Starting in the Renaissance, artists in their quest for naturalism studied and drew the human body, sometimes using cadavers despite clear interdiction from the Catholic church. Centuries later, the rise of surgical education in the 18th century created a demand for cadavers to be used in dissection and anatomical demonstrations. A new trade of “body snatchers,” or “resurrection men,” emerged to meet this demand. This exhibition tells the story of shifting meanings attached to dead bodies, from religious reverence to medical authority.

The works in the exhibition cast us all as “body snatchers,” people who find meaning and value in the raw facts of death. Artists include Lavinia Fontana, Romare Howard Bearden, Francisco de Goya, Salvador Dalì, and others. Related works—marked as part of the exhibition—will be on view at The Alfond Inn at Rollins.

José A. Figueroa (Cuban, b. 1946), De la serie Exilio. Despedidas en calle 17. La Habana (Part 1), 1965 - 1967, Silver gelatin print, The Alfond Collection of Contemporary Art, Cornell Fine Arts Museum, Rollins College 2014.1.51.1 © José A. Figuero. Image courtesy of the artist José A. Figueroa (Cuban, b. 1946), De la serie Exilio. Despedidas en calle 17. La Habana (Part 1), 1965 - 1967, Silver gelatin print, The Alfond Collection of Contemporary Art, Cornell Fine Arts Museum, Rollins College 2014.1.51.1 © José A. Figuero. Image courtesy of the artist

A third exhibition drawn from the collection features the work of Cuban photojournalist José A. Figueroa in José A. Figueroa: A “Transitional Generation.” 2019 marks the 60th anniversary of the Cuban Revolution (1953-1959), which culminated in the ousting of authoritarian Cuban President Fulgencio Batista and the establishment of a revolutionary communist regime led by Fidel Castro. Over time artists have reacted to, recorded, and reflected on the millions of lives impacted during the Revolution and in the years following. This exhibition will be on view through April 7.

Born in Havana in 1946, José A. Figueroa has been a chronicler of daily life in the island nation for more than 40 years. Considered part of the “transitional generation”—described by Cristina Vives, the artist’s wife, as too young to have been an active participant in the Revolution but old enough to witness it—his body of work offers a unique perspective of this time.

In addition to documentary photographs that speak to his experience as a photojournalist, Figueroa captures intimate snapshots of life in Cuba, often portraying his family and close friends engaging in everyday activities. From the last portrait a family took together before leaving the island to images of children on the street, the artist has referred to his work as a “Cuban self-portrait” representing with equal power individual experience and historical event.

Related Programming
 

Friday, January 25 | 11 a.m.

Exhibition Tour: The Place as Metaphor: Collection Conversations
Morgan Snoap
Fred Hicks Curatorial Fellow, Cornell Fine Arts Museum

Tuesday, January 29 | 6 p.m.
Student Talks: The Place as Metaphor: Collection Conversations

Tuesday, February 26 | 6 p.m.
Performance: Sonic Borders III
Artist Guillermo Galindo

Tuesday, March 26 | 6 p.m.
Panel Discussion: Body Snatchers
Emily Russell and panelists

Friday, April 26 | 11 a.m.
Lecture: Reflections on Light: Glassworks from the Collection
Elizabeth Coulter
Dale Montgomery Fellow, Cornell Fine Arts Museum

Visitor Information
 

Museum Location
Cornell Fine Arts Museum, Rollins College
1000 Holt Ave.
Winter Park, FL 32789-4499
407.646.2526
rollins.edu/cfam

Museum Hours
Tuesday: 10 a.m. to 7 p.m.
Wednesday-Friday: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Saturday-Sunday: noon to 5 p.m.
Closed Mondays, major holidays, and during installation periods

CFAM Public Tours
Free staff-led tours on Saturdays at 1 p.m.
3rd Thursday of the month at 12:30 p.m., unless otherwise noted
Private tours for groups of 8 or more, email ecoulter@rollins.edu

Museum Admission
FREE ADMISSION courtesy of PNC Financial Services Group

Alfond Inn Location
The Alfond Inn at Rollins College
300 E. New England Ave.
Winter Park, FL 32789
thealfondinn.com

Alfond Inn Art Tours
Free staff-led tours on Sundays at 1 p.m.
1st Wednesday of the month at 5:30 p.m., unless otherwise noted
Audio guide available at: http://myoncell.mobi/10008329968